Tag: drugs

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Zapf Punkt Summer Solstice 2021

Hot off the laptop, here’s the tenth issue of Zapf.Punkt for all you deca-philes out there. Download your free copy from Diamond Bay Press: Zapf.punkt 10 (Summer Solstice)Download from Diamond Bay Pr

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Izumi Suzuki's Terminal Boredom

Join Diamond Bay Radio for a celebration of the Japanese science fiction author, Izumi Suzuki. In this episode, we interview Daniel Joseph, translator, about the first anthology of Suzuki’s science

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Zapf Punkt Winter Solstice 2020

Join us for the lucky eigth issue of Zapf.Punkt. Download your free copy from Diamond Bay Press: Zapf.punkt 8 (Winter Solstice)Download from Diamond Bay Press Face facts, the Republican Party is a fl

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Zapf Punkt Autumn Equinox 2020

Join us for the seventh issue of Zapf.Punkt. Download your free copy from Diamond Bay Press: Zapf.punkt 7 (Autumn Equinox 2020)Download from Diamond Bay Press Are we talking about invisible conspirac

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Seb Doubinsky on Diamond Bay Radio

Join us for a podcast on Seb Doubinsky’s novel in the City-States cycle: The Invisible (August 2020, Meerkat Press). go to the PODCAST In Seb Doubinsky’s speculative fiction, the world is separated i

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Synthetic Drugs on a Bummel

The Song of Synth by Seb Doubinsky is a science fiction novel about about a strange new drug that creates a fungible boundary between our perceptions of real and virtual worlds. The story fits loose

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Ka-chow! sneezes the roscoe.

The opening of Jack Womack’s _Going Going Gone_, injects us into an unpredictable world that wobbles between an alternate hipster-scene of New York City in the 1960s and the seemingly hallucinatory ramblings of a drug-addled protagonist, Walter Bullitt. The story begins in a Washington, D.C. hotel room, where the first person jive talk kicks in: “Soon as I spiked I turned my eyes inside. Setting old snakehead on cruise control always pleases, no matter how quick the trip.” Sprinkled through almost every sentence are hokey metaphors. The phone doesn’t ring, “those jingle bells“ do. And on the other end of the line is a Federal agent of some kind, who is so square that he can’t understand a word of the hipster-narrator. But the narrator is more like one of the Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers than a secret agent, and he himself was so startled by the phone that he almost made for the john to “drown his bagged cat.” To flush his pot down the toilet, get it?

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Clearing the Minefields of Self-Indoctrination

Pleasantly surprised to discover Indoctrinaire, the first novel by Christopher Priest, a tale of strange foreboding and paranoia, wrapped up in altered states of consciousness and alternate realities. The protagonist, Dr. Wentik, finds himself forcibly recruited from his scientific research post beneath the South Pole, and whisked away to the Planalto District of Mato Grosso in Brazil. Both of these places are so far off the beaten track and outside of the ordinary world of human affairs that the novel begins with an eerie sense of dislocation, which is only accelerated into total disorientation as soon as Wentik begins to trek into the strangely deforested zone of Planalto. His guide, a tight-lipped man named Musgrove, shows signs of mental illness as the story progresses and Wentik finds himself an occupant of “the jail,” under interrogation by an equally opaque antagonist named Astourde.

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Aloha Mars, Can-D gram for Perky Pat!

Given the opportunity, I just couldn’t resist sending a little micro-chipped token of my affection to my favorite sub-miniaturized phantasm on Mars. Aloha, Perky Pat! How’s the water at Lake Shalb