Tag: criticism

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Zapf Punkt Winter Solstice 2020

Join us for the lucky eigth issue of Zapf.Punkt. Download your free copy from Diamond Bay Press: Zapf.punkt 8 (Winter Solstice)Download from Diamond Bay Press Face facts, the Republican Party is a fl

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Ovid TV Enters From Left Field

The reason I wanted to check out Ovid.tv was to watch the documentary about a small town in Southwest China, called Ghost Town. There was a showing of it several years ago that I missed and I was su

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Zapf Punkt Autumn Equinox 2020

Join us for the seventh issue of Zapf.Punkt. Download your free copy from Diamond Bay Press: Zapf.punkt 7 (Autumn Equinox 2020)Download from Diamond Bay Press Are we talking about invisible conspirac

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Zapf Punkt Winter Solstice 2019

Happy Winter Solstice of 2019! The fourth issue of Zapf.Punkt can be downloaded from Diamond Bay Press: Zapf.punkt 4 (Winter Solstice 2019)Download PDF This has been a rough year. Let’s face it. Th

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Gwyneth Jones on Joanna Russ

The new biography of Joanna Russ by Gwyneth Jones is a marvel. Published in the Modern Masters of Science Fiction Series from the University of Illinois Press, this book provides a timely and thorou

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Time Travel in Paris

Painting (c) Todd Schorr Lisa Goldstein’s first novel, The Red Magician, won the National Book Award in 1983, in the category for “original paperback novel.” Strangely that is the only year that ca

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The mystique of Keleck

My first taste of any artwork associated with Keleck (aka Kelek), was at Boskone this year, where Andy Gelas brought my attention to two French paperback editions of Conan. These were Conan Le Guerrier, and Conan Le Cimmerian, in the Titres SF editions from the early 1980s. Needless to say, the eye-popping contrast in red and black, and the the purity of design in these covers hit me like a sucker-punch in a Philip Marlowe story.   Le Cimmerian has a pure movie-poster effect, with that smashing red background, and the bare skin of the figures has a smooth air-brushed look, while the tightly delineated designs on the metal are all perfectly highlighted. The first thing I noticed about Le Guerrier is the darkness of the figure, of the rich draperies, of the stairwell vanishing into shadow. The hair is certainly done the same way as Le Cimmerian: frizzy threads in direct highlight against the background. But in Le Guerrier, the eyes, the skin, the deliberate brushstrokes on the wall, and the marble steps; they have a very different aesthetic from the super-slick air-brushing of Le Cimmerian. What is going on here?